ISGS Seminar Series

The Silurian Racine Formation at Forsyth Field, central Illinois: Potential for significant petroleum recovery in a mature oil field

Monday, October 9, 2017 - 11:00am

Leighton Conference Room (room 101), Natural Resources Building

Presented by:

Dr. Yaghoob Lasemi (Illinois State Geological Survey)

Forsyth Field lies in the extreme northeast part of the Mt. Auburn trend of the Sangamon Arch in the northwest of the Illinois Basin, central Illinois. Discovered in 1963, the field has accumulated over 750,000 barrels of oil essentially from a dolomite reservoir in the upper part of the Racine Formation. The Racine (over 240 ft.) consists of interbedded limestone, dolomite, silty argillaceous dolomite or limestone, and calcareous shale. An unconformity subdivides the formation into two sequences and the reservoir interval at Forsyth occurs in the upper part of the upper Racine sequence. The reservoir is a lenticular, locally compartmentalized, dolomite body reaching a maximum net thickness of nearly 12 feet and an average porosity of 16%. A combination of depositional and diagenetic processes and updip pinch out of the reservoir against the Sangamon Arch was responsible for Petroleum entrapment.

Original oil in place at Forsyth is over 11 million barrels and the field has produced approximately 7% of its OOIP. Poor reservoir performance and below average cumulative primary production (nearly 10,000 barrels per well) suggest poor permeability for the dolomite reservoir interval at Forsyth. However, there is a great potential for improving petroleum recovery from the field. There are over 20 undrilled locations and in the developed areas, the reservoir was stimulated with relatively small volume fracturing. Development of the undrilled areas, infill drilling, and larger volume hydraulic fracturing will undoubtedly improve recovery from the field. The reservoir at Forsyth Field has never been waterflooded; the field is close to a commercial source of CO2 and is a potential candidate for CO2 enhanced oil recovery, which could result in storage of anthropogenic carbon dioxide and increased oil production.

Seminar flyer: http://isgs.illinois.edu/sites/isgs/files/seminar/ISGS_SeminarFlyer_20171009.pdf

About the speaker:

Dr. Lasemi is a petroleum geologist/carbonate sedimentologist and has been with the Illinois State Geological Survey since September 2007. He has a PhD from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, a MS from Michigan State University, East Lansing, and a BS degree from Kharazmi University (formerly Teachers Training College), Tehran. Yaghoob worked as a research assistant at the ISGS from 1977-1979 and as exploration geologist in southern Illinois from 1981-87. During 1988, he worked and lectured short courses related to petroleum geology in the National Iranian Oil Company Exploration Office, Tehran. He was a faculty member in the Department of Geology at Khwarazmi University in Tehran from1989 to 2007. Currently, he is working on facies analysis, sequence stratigraphic framework, and various aspects of petroleum geology of the Lower Paleozoic deposits in the Illinois basin.


ISGS Seminar - Development, Progression, and Containment of Elevated Temperatures in Landfills

Monday, May 22, 2017 - 11:00am

Leighton Conference Room (room 101), Natural Resources Building

Presented by:

Dr. Timothy D. Stark (UIUC Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Elevated temperatures in various landfill types can produce obnoxious odors, toxic gases, and aggressive leachates, as well as damage landfill infrastructure. They also can result in expensive remedial measures and warrant permanent closure of the facility.  This presentation will discuss mechanisms that can lead to elevated temperatures in landfills using recent case histories and present associated trends in gas composition, leachate collection, settlement, and slope movement. In general, landfill gas composition changes from predominantly methane (50-60% v/v) and carbon dioxide (40-55% v/v) to a composition of carbon dioxide (60-80% v/v), hydrogen (10-35% v/v), and carbon monoxide (>1,500 ppmv) as temperatures elevate. As waste temperatures increase, gas and leachate pressures also increase, resulting in odors, leachate outbreaks, and possible slope instability. Based on observed management, operation, and maintenance of elevated temperature facilities, various operational techniques will be presented for isolating and containing the elevated temperatures.

Seminar flyer: http://isgs.illinois.edu/sites/isgs/files/seminar/ISGS_SeminarFlyer_20170522.pdf

About the speaker:

Dr. Stark is a Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign with an expertise in Geotechnical Engineering. Dr. Stark has been conducting research on the static and seismic stability of landfill liner and cover systems for the last twenty-five (25) years. His research on the static and seismic stability of waste containment facilities has led to a better understanding on geosynthetic durability, design values of geosynthetic interface strengths for stability analyses, the importance of interim slope conditions in landfill operations, the shear behavior of geosynthetic clay liners, and three-dimensional slope stability analyses for the design of slopes underlain by weak geosynthetic interfaces and/or soil layers. In the last ten years he has been studying the effects of elevated temperatures in various types of landfills and the long-term durability of geosynthetics in geo-environmental applications with and without elevated temperatures. Dr. Stark has received a number of awards for his research, teaching, and service activities including: Best Paper in Geosynthetics International Journal, 2016; R.S. Ladd D18 Standards Development Award, ASTM, 2014, 2011, 2002; Thomas A. Middlebrooks Award from the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2013 and 1998. He received the Associate Editor Award, from ASCE's Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering in 2012, and is now Selected Editor for the journal.


Solid as a Rock: How engineering geology relates to transportation asset management

Monday, April 17, 2017 - 2:00pm

Leighton Conference Room (room 101), Natural Resources Building

Presented by:

Dr. Scott Anderson (BGC Engineering Incorporated)
2017 Jahns Lecturer - Association of Environmental & Engineering Geoscientists (AEG)

Highway systems were built over a short period of time and to an envisioned design life that is expiring. Owners of transportation infrastructure are finding a pressing need to get the most of what they have and to build new inventory with this kind of thought in mind. This requires risk-based strategies for management of assets such as bridges, pavement, subgrade, embankments, walls and slopes, and it also requires a clear look at what type of performance is expected, and what is actually needed. Settlement, heave, slope movements, longevity under the influence of scour and corrosion are some of the ways this performance can be measured for structures of soil and rock. The engineering geologist can explain that change happens and relatively few things are ‘solid as a rock’. The change represents a risk that the engineering geologist can help characterize and view in parallel with risks from natural hazards.

Seminar flyer: http://isgs.illinois.edu/sites/isgs/files/seminar/ISGS_SeminarFlyer_20170417.pdf

About the speaker:

Dr. Anderson recently joined BGC Engineering as a Principal Geotechnical Engineer. Prior to joining BGC he worked as the Geotechnical Engineering Technical Services Team Manager for the Federal Highway Administration’s (FHWA) Resource Center where he led a national team of geotechnical engineers that assisted state and local transportation agencies through technical assistance, training and the deployment of new technologies.  Dr. Anderson has also previously worked in positions from Staff Geologist to Senior Consulting Engineer and Landslide Technology Leader for a major A/E design firm and spent four years as an Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering at the University of Hawaii.  He earned his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in engineering geology from the University of Colorado at Boulder and Colorado State University, and Master’s and Doctorate degrees in civil engineering from the University of California at Berkeley.  He is a licensed engineer and practicing engineering geologist with over 30 years of experience and approximately 100 publications and invited presentations, and he makes his home in Colorado.


Report from PRI Data Stewardship Advisory Committee

Monday, April 10, 2017 - 11:00am

Leighton Conference Room (room 101), Natural Resources Building

Presented by:

Mark Yacucci (Illinois State Geological Survey)

This presentation will focus on activities of the Data Stewardship Committee and how they affect the Geological Survey. A demonstration of the metadata tool will be presented, as well as where to archive and locate data.


Geomechanical Testing for Geo-Energy Applications

Monday, March 27, 2017 - 11:00am

Leighton Conference Room (room 101), Natural Resources Building

Presented by:

Dr. Roman Y. Makhnenko (Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign)

Shallow sedimentary formations are being considered for geo-energy applications, including CO2 and nuclear waste storage and geo-energy production. Proper functioning of the related projects requires accurate characterization of hydro-mechanical behavior of the rock. Experimental techniques were developed to saturate high-permeable (sandstones and limestones) and low-permeable geomaterials (shales) with different fluids, including oil, water, brine, and carbon dioxide. High-pressure conventional triaxial, oedometric, and plane strain compression testing methods were utilized to measure poroelastic, inelastic, failure, and flow properties. Additionally, chemical and viscous effects were detected and predicted to have important implications for long-term storage projects.

Seminar flyer: http://isgs.illinois.edu/sites/isgs/files/seminar/ISGS_SeminarFlyer_20170327.pdf

About the speaker:

Dr. Makhnenko received his undergraduate degree in mechanics and applied mathematics at Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia, in 2007. He then obtained his MS (2009) and PhD (2013) in geological and civil engineering from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. From 2013 to 2016, Roman worked as a postdoctoral researcher and lecturer at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL, Switzerland). Since December 2016, he is an assistant professor in geotechnical engineering at the University of Illinois. Dr. Makhnenko has expertise in geomechanics and development of novel methods in laboratory characterization of fluid-saturated geomaterials under elevated temperatures and pressures with applications to deep CO2 storage, gas shales, and hydraulic fracturing.


A Look at the History of the ISGS Publication Record

Monday, March 13, 2017 - 11:00am

Leighton Conference Room (room 101), Natural Resources Building

Presented by:

Anne Huber (Illinois State Geological Survey)

Researchers at the Illinois State Geological Survey have been writing and publishing since the establishment of the organization in 1906. Publishing venues include the in-house publication series, as well as journal articles, conference presentations, books, and book chapters. And there are many catalogs and indexes that describe and track this record. You may ask, how is information about ISGS research disseminated, how are we keeping track of it all, and how can this help me?

I will discuss the databases and tools that are used to manage and archive the ISGS publication record and how these tools can help you in your research. Topics for discussion include the IDEALS repository, staff bibliography in a Zotero database, and the Illinois Experts database.

Additional Information:

ISGS in IDEALS repository: https://www.ideals.illinois.edu/handle/2142/16943
ISGS staff bibliography: https://www.zotero.org/groups/illinois_state_geological_survey_staff_bibliography
ISGS in Illinois Experts database: https://experts.illinois.edu/en/organisations/illinois-state-geological-survey

Seminar flyer: http://isgs.illinois.edu/sites/isgs/files/seminar/ISGS_SeminarFlyer_20170313.pdf

About the speaker:

Anne Huber is the Geologic Information Curator at the Illinois State Geological Survey. She joined the organization in 2006. Anne received a Master of Library Science from Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Master of Science in Environmental Science from Indiana University, and a Bachelor of Arts in chemistry from Kalamazoo College.


The Origin and Evolution of the Natural Resources Building

Monday, February 27, 2017 - 11:00am

Leighton Conference Room (room 101), Natural Resources Building

Presented by:

Dr. Donald Luman (Illinois State Geological Survey)

Situated on the University of Illinois campus, the Natural Resources Building as shown in the accompanying photograph was the outcome of 14 years of deliberations and negotiations beginning in 1926, culminating with its formal dedication in October 1940. Using archival correspondence, documents and plan drawings from the University of Illinois Archives, Facilities & Services Records and Information Office, U of I Board of Trustees Minutes, University of Illinois at Chicago Library, Illinois State Library and Illinois State Geological Survey, the rich heritage of the Natural Resources Building can now be fully appreciated. The presentation will highlight the art, architecture, as well as the key individuals and events responsible for the creation of this unique building.

Additional Information: https://www.isgs.illinois.edu/content/natural-resources-building

Seminar flyer: http://isgs.illinois.edu/sites/isgs/files/seminar/ISGS_SeminarFlyer_20170227.pdf

About the speaker:

Dr. Luman is a Principal Geologist Honorary at the Illinois State Geological Survey. He has worked at the ISGS since 1995 and retired in 2014. Don earned his Ph.D. in 1978 from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, and before first joining the Illinois Natural History Survey in 1993, was an Associate Professor in the Department of Geography at Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, where he taught remote sensing, cartography and GIS.